Web API


Wikipedia says the following about Web API: “A web API is an application programming interface (API) for either a web server or a web browser. It is a web development concept, usually limited to a web application’s client-side (including any web frameworks being used), and thus usually does not include web server or browser implementation details such as SAPIs or web browser engine APIs unless publicly accessible by a remote web application”.

Google defines an API for as website as follows: “An application-programming interface (API) is a set of programming instructions and standards for accessing a Web-based software application or Web tool. A software company releases its API to the public so that other software developers can design products that are powered by its service.”

Wikipedia defines an API as this: “API (application program interface) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. The API specifies how software components should interact and APIs are used when programming graphical user interface (GUI) components.” In the simplest terms, APIs are sets of requirements that govern how one application can talk to another.

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To read more about the importance of Web API’s, have a look at the article at readwrite.com called “What APIs Are And Why They’re Important”.

The article mentioned in the paragraph above goes on to say that APIs have been around for a while. Whenever one program shares it data with another program, an API is being used. For example, the Windows clipboard.

The article goes on to say: “On the Web, APIs make it possible for big services like Google Maps or Facebook to let other apps “piggyback” on their offerings. Think about the way Yelp, for instance, displays nearby restaurants on a Google Map in its app, or the way some video games now let players chat, post high scores and invite friends to play via Facebook, right there in the middle of a game.”

“APIs do all this by “exposing” some of a program’s internal functions to the outside world in a limited fashion. That makes it possible for applications to share data and take actions on one another’s behalf without requiring developers to share all of their software’s code. APIs simplify all that by limiting outside program access to a specific set of features—often enough, requests for data of one sort or another. Feel free to think of them as doors, windows or levers if you like.”

“Facebook users undoubtedly appreciate the ability to sign into many apps and Web sites using their Facebook ID—a feature that relies upon Facebook APIs to work … The developer of a game app, for instance, can use the Dropbox API to let users store their saved games in the Dropbox cloud instead of working out some other cloud-storage option from scratch.”

“APIs make possible a sprawling array of Web-service “mashups,” in which developers use mix and match APIs from the likes of Google or Facebook or Twitter to create entirely new apps and services.”

Sharing data is a great idea but as the article says: “Companies can shut down services and APIs that your applications depend on—or they can go out of business entirely”.

Example – Yelp and Maps

ReadWrite’s article says: “When you search for nearby restaurants in the Yelp app for Android, for instance, it will plot their locations on Google Maps instead of creating its own maps. Via the Google Maps API, the Yelp app passes the information it wants plotted—restaurant addresses, say, along with the Yelp star rating and more—to an internal Google Maps function that then returns a Map object with restaurant pins in it at the proper locations. Which Yelp can then display inside its app. (On iOS, Yelp taps Apple’s Maps API for the same purpose.)”

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