Radio-frequency Identification (RFID)


What is RFID? Here is what Wikipedia says of RFID: “Radio-frequency identification (RFID) uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects. The tags contain electronically stored information. Passive tags collect energy from a nearby RFID reader’s interrogating radio waves. Active tags have a local power source such as a battery and may operate hundreds of meters from the RFID reader. Unlike a barcode, the tag need not be within the line of sight of the reader, so it may be embedded in the tracked object. RFID is one method for Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC).”

Wikipedia goes on to say: “RFID tags are used in many industries, for example, an RFID tag attached to an automobile during production can be used to track its progress through the assembly line; RFID-tagged pharmaceuticals can be tracked through warehouses; and implanting RFID microchips in livestock and pets allows for positive identification of animals.”

Wikipedia says: “In 2014, the world RFID market was worth US$8.89 billion, up from US$7.77 billion in 2013 and US$6.96 billion in 2012. This figure includes tags, readers, and software/services for RFID cards, labels, fobs, and all other form factors. The market value is expected to rise to US$18.68 billion by 2026”

What is a fob? In this context, a fob is also called a key fob. A key fob, according to www.techopedia.com is “a small electronic security device with built-in authentication protocols or mechanisms to allow whoever possesses it to enter a secured network or location in order to access data or services. A key fob is designed to be small so that it can be carried around inconspicuously just like a key chain, hence the name key fob.” In computers, “form factor” is the size, configuration, or physical arrangement of a computing device.

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