Distributed Databases


Wikipedia says: “System administrators can distribute collections of data (e.g. in a database) across multiple physical locations. A distributed database can reside on organized network servers or decentralized independent computers on the Internet, on corporate intranets or extranets, or on other organization networks.” A distributed database is a database in which storage devices are not all attached to a common processor. It may be stored in multiple computers, located in the same physical location; or may be dispersed over a network of interconnected computers.

One example of a distributed database is blockchain.

System administrators can distribute collections of data (e.g. in a database) across multiple physical locations. A distributed database can reside on network servers on the Internet, on corporate intranets or extranets, or on other company networks. Because they store data across multiple computers, distributed databases can improve performance at end-user worksites by allowing transactions to be processed on many machines, instead of being limited to one.

Replication and Duplication

Two processes ensure that the distributed databases remain up-to-date and current: replication and duplication. Both replication and duplication can keep the data current in all distributive locations.

Replication involves using specialized software that looks for changes in the distributive database. Once the changes have been identified, the replication process makes all the databases look the same. The replication process can be complex and time-consuming depending on the size and number of the distributed databases. This process can also require a lot of time and computer resources.

Duplication, on the other hand, has less complexity. It basically identifies one database as a master and then duplicates that database. The duplication process is normally done at a set time after hours. This is to ensure that each distributed location has the same data. In the duplication process, users may change only the master database. This ensures that local data will not be overwritten.

Today the distributed DBMS market is evolving dramatically, with new, innovative entrants and incumbents supporting the growing use of unstructured data and NoSQL DBMS engines, as well as XML databases and NewSQL databases. These databases are increasingly supporting distributed database architecture that provides high availability and fault tolerance through replication and scale out ability. Some examples are Aerospike, Cassandra, Clusterpoint, ClustrixDB, Couchbase, Druid (open-source data store), FoundationDB, NuoDB, Riak and OrientDB.

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